So, you must be the Reindeer Lady

Emily Wiesendanger, The Late Pleistocene Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) of Britain and Western Europe: Past Migrations, Seasonality and Palaeodiet, supervised by Prof. Danielle Schreve (RHUL) and Prof. Ian Candy (RHUL) ‘Let me see. (takes the skull) Alas, poor Rudolph, I knew him.’ Oh dear, she’s talking to the skulls again.  No wonder. I was in a …

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Running from Dorian: a cruise experience to remember

As many PhD students in physical geography will attest, the fieldwork is always the most exciting and fun part of the research process. So when I started my PhD on the Younger Dryas, and how it is recorded in marine and terrestrial records, I didn't have high hopes for getting any marine-based fieldwork. While it …

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New excavations at Westbury Cave: a palaeontological treasure trove – Neil Adams

After some fabulous blog posts from our MSc students over the last couple of months, our next contribution is from Neil Adams.  Neil is a former undergraduate student at Royal Holloway and since graduating in 2015 has been working as a Research Assistant under the tutelage of Professor Danielle Schreve.  Hope you enjoy this really nicely …

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MSc Quaternary Science 2015-2016: Sylvia Kwong

Here we go with the third instalment from our intrepid MSc Quaternary Science students and we move away from the sedimentology and chronology side of things to look at a palaeoecological proxy. Name: Sylvia Kwong MSc Dissertation title: A comparison of chironomid-inferred summer temperatures with a Lateglacial pollen record from Tanera Mor, NW Scotland Proxies: …

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The ancient origins of British mammals

By Melissa Marr  (2nd Year PhD student) Between 26 000 to 21 000 years ago the earth was in the grip of an ice age and global ice sheets were at their maximum extent. Most of Britain was covered with glacial ice and the mammal species that existed were very different from today, consisting of …

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The bear facts: reconstructing diet in Ice Age carnivores

By Spyridoula Pappa (PhD Student) Example of Ursus arctos skull, lower jaw and carnassial tooth (m1: first lower molar). Often during my PhD research, I feel like a “bear dentist” and a “detective” at the same time. My project involves the analysis of teeth of the most remarkably diverse of the carnivores (at least in …

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A visit to Banwell Bone Cave

by Danielle Schreve (Professor of Quaternary Science) It’s not every day that you get to visit a Site of Special Scientific Interest that once formed the centrepiece of a 19th century “theme park” on the Biblical Deluge but that’s exactly what Danielle Schreve, Lucy Flower (PhD student) and Dave Arnold (MSc Quaternary Science student) did, …

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Shell secrets: Using freshwater snails to understand past climates

   by Jenni Sherriff (PhD Student) Freshwater gastropod and bivalve shells from the River Thames. A large part of my research involves crushing shells. This is not due to a personal vendetta against freshwater molluscs, but because the chemistry of the shells themselves have the potential to provide important climatic information about the environments in …

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